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Moneyweb Radio ran the following interview with Adrian Saville on 4 August 2014.

SIKI MGABADELI: As part of the Citadel Inspiration Indaba we speak to inspirational and innovative South Africans who've done great things. We are joined now by Dr Adrian Saville. Adrian is executive director and chief investment officer at Cannon Asset Managers.
    Adrian, thanks so much for your time today. You've been involved in the Asset Management industry since 1994, what led you down this path?

SIKI MGABADELI: As part of the Citadel Inspiration Indaba we speak to inspirational and innovative South Africans who've done great things. We are joined now by Dr Adrian Saville. Adrian is executive director and chief investment officer at Cannon Asset Managers. Adrian, thanks so much for your time today. You've been involved in the Asset Management industry since 1994, what led you down this path?

ADRIAN SAVILLE: Thanks Siki, What led me into investment management, really, is I suppose a fascination with two things. The one is the economic environment that sits around businesses, and this economic environment has a constant and a constantly changing influence on the businesses that we're trying to build.
    And then from an investment perspective, aside from education, probably one of the single most important decisions you will take in your career is how to allocate your financial capital as opposed to your human capital. And being able to make wise decisions in this regard, I think has a permanent effect on the life that you live.

SIKI MGABADELI: You talked about the economic environment for businesses and your interest in that. One of the focus areas in your work is the competitiveness of companies, of industries and countries, and looking into what enables South African companies to succeed in this increasingly harsh global environment. And it's quite harsh for us. What are your views on that?

SIKI MGABADELI: Yes I think that you've flagged a couple of important points there. And, just talking about South Africa, here we could probably acknowledge that, aside from South Korea, South Africa has the highest number of multinational corporations built out of an economy adjusted for size. And that really underlines our capability of building truly spectacular international businesses.
    In the same breath, the South African economy appears to punch way below its weight, and we haven't been able to build per capita incomes equivalent to South Korea or some of the East European economies by way of example.
    And this then puts a question mark over what needs to be done to help the rest of the South African economy catch up to the capabilities of that leading edge.
    History here is a really great teacher and we can learn not just from the examples of other economies, other countries – and the pool of history here is really rich. Cases include Chile, Estonia, the Czech Republic, and South Korea as I've already alluded to.
    And then, whilst the context matters, it also matters a lot what you do in that context. And, as executives and business decision-makers, we have a profound ability to change trajectory. And you can think of some great comparatives. One of my favourite examples is comparing the trajectory of Kodak to Fuji, both in the film industry. The one filed for bankruptcy in 2012; the other rose on to employ 100 000 people at present. That's Kodak versus Fuji. …

The rest of the discussion is available on Moneyweb.